AMM Connect Post

 

As my school term comes to a close, I thought I’d do a post about my next goal, applying to Author Mentor Match, and thus do a blog post to connect with other AMM hopefuls.

I’m Noelle M. Pierce, and I’m a Pennsylvania cryptid who is holding onto book ideas like a kangaroo with a grossly overstuffed pouch of joeys. I’m entering my senior year in my Dramatic Writing degree with a minor in Animation. Because my school didn’t have the exact major I wanted to switch to, I found some additional love for dramatic writing which has helped me structure stories and made a plotter out of a pantser. Currently, I’m looking into graduate schools with Writing and Publishing degrees with the hopes of becoming an editor.

(Because of my art background, I can draw my characters! So that’s fun. These two are unrelated to my WIP, but have their own stories.)

Regarding novels, I write in various parts of the Young Adult age range. I like to mix up what genres I write because I like challenging myself. However, most of my books tend to sway towards sci-fi, fantasy, and horror. I’ve already written three other books besides the one I’ve been working on for pursuing the querying process for my first time. If you follow me on this blog, you might have seen mention of it before when I was looking for beta readers. It’s What Darkness Does, a YA horror that involves a couple of kids, an albino deer, and a forest that is deceptively dangerous, just like the people around it.

img_1003

This isn’t a cover or anything, just something to give the vibe. Picture from pexel.com.

What makes this one different than the others? For starters, I wrote the first draft in about a month, so there’s no voice changes / visible skill changes throughout it like two of the other books that I wrote the first draft to across multiple years. Secondly, it’s the first I’ve put active planning into. Beforehand, I was a pantser. That was fun and all, but even more fun was having a guide plan for what I wanted to do so I could finish it in a timely manner. It’s been interesting teaching myself how to edit, and I’ve done about 4 passes at it.

I’d make a great mentee because I reflect the energy that I get from my collaborators. If there’s one thing I’ve learned from my college career, it’s that giving and receiving feedback is an essential part of growing both as a person and a writer. I love hearing suggestions on how to improve things; while not every suggestion is incorporated, I’m the type of person that gets excited about new twists and other potential directions the book can go in when it aligns with the spirit of the book.

I’m excited to connect with other writers and submit to AMM once the next round opens!

Sims Writing Challenge

Writer’s block is tough to break through. Sometimes you just have to ride it out, especially if it’s from being burned out. Other times, you can find a way around it. When I’m stuck and also lucky, I manage to find a way to do something else that triggers an idea or a surge of energy to do something. Lately, I’ve been super burnt out, so I’ve been doodling and designing sticker sets on my laptop. Another thing I do is people watch. When I was using my school’s transportation, I would watch people out the window of the bus. Now, I go to my favorite café, grab a window seat, and it’s like lunch/dinner and a movie. I was able to find a way to fill the gap between one event and the climax of one book this way. Then it hit me.

What if I watched people, but through the Sims? Sims is one of my fallbacks for when I’m burnt out. I can easily lose hours just making the sim themselves, not to mention their house, family, and life. I have Sims 3 and 4, but I’ve been playing around with 4 since I’m still actively buying game packs and expansions for it. The autonomous function is always interesting to watch, or at least, look back to after a small break while letting it run. With my love of Sims and writing, I decided to make a writing challenge.

At the end of this blog post I will have the rules and potential lists to use for your own use. The point is to randomize everything as much as possible, and have very little control. One of my downloaded items glitched out so I had to randomize an actually usable sim to do so, but it’d be interesting if I had used that character. However, I worried if it would crash the game. I’d say getting a job is optional, but it can give you more of an idea of their personality and some flair for the character too.

peytoncronin

The first character I generated was a girl by the name of Peyton Cronin. She had long pink hair like some sort of anime character and had an interesting set of outfits. Her main set was a pink shirt (that miraculously didn’t clash), some jeans, and some tan boots. Her aspiration in life was to be a city native and have the best turf to own. She was a painter, which could explain the artsy choice of pink hair. Her traits consisted of being a goofball, hating children, and being erratic. The erratic trait used to be the “insane” trait, so likewise the sim will talk to themselves, change outfits randomly, and be unstable. She was a great first character and would be an interesting main character for a book maybe. Noted.

tiaramasters

I wasn’t sure if I wanted to have a second character or not, but I added one and I fell in love with her design immediately. Her name was Tiara Masters, and she had short black cropped hair and matching black cat ears. Alright, anime town it was. Tiara’s outfits made more sense than Peyton’s for the most part. She aspired to be a mansion baron, which goes almost hand-in-hand with Peyton’s. Tiara’s traits were that she was jealous, ambitious, and a bookworm, generally normal traits. She wound up being a detective, which I wonder if she’d be able to hide her ears with the hat.

Randomizing relations, they became a married couple, and they wound up living in Brindleton Bay, a nice little town that was from the pet expansion. For the main event, however, they wound up going to Skye Fitness in San Myshuno, a city which is inspired by modern cities like New York, San Francisco, and even Tokyo. The gym itself is connected to a patch of land outside of it, which provided some more leeway for interactions, albeit not too many.

As an observer, the first idea I got was from Peyton and Tiara watching a female street performer for hours. They never tipped her or anything, they just stood and watched. They didn’t even talk. The performer eventually left. It was odd how they didn’t interact, even though they were doing the action together. The oddness could provide a way to try to explain such a thing via storytelling. It wasn’t my speed, so let’s move on.

The second idea was from Peyton and Tiara playing basketball together, alone on the rooftop. They were talking together privately until this male gym trainer came up. Tiara left, and perhaps because of her jealousy trait, but otherwise I could apply that as the reasoning and use her trait in that way for inspiration. Tiara went downstairs to go use an exercise machine that I believe is just a weight machine. In this case, Tiara would be the main character of that story.

The third idea was from Tiara and Peyton having a conversation. They’re sleepy and hungry but were otherwise doing okay. Peyton is feeling flirty, and Tiara leaves to take a shower. Peyton goes to use a weight machine and Don Lothario waltzes over, having a flirty conversation with Peyton that goes well. He did this another time before this specific instance. This could be dramatic; is Peyton cheating on Tiara? Or was Don a past fling? Or was she just being polite since this guy is clearly a musclehead bro who could probably bench press her.

The fourth, and last idea was when Peyton was having an erratic moment and was arguing with herself in the corner while three other people in the area were exercising. Initially, I didn’t think much of this until I was reviewing my game footage. How weird would it be if someone was just having a dramatic conversation with only themselves in the middle of this rich area’s gym? That’d be wild! Two people were on the treadmill, and one guy was boxing right next to her.

Overall, the last two ideas intrigued me, but I’m almost leaning towards the fourth more. Now the hard part is writing it, or rather, finding time to focus and write it. It definitely helped me generate ideas, which was the ultimate goal of this challenge, besides producing something. I plan on writing one of the ideas, however, I’m not going to upload it because if it turns out well enough, I might try to shop it around the short story ring of submittable.

Let me know if this challenge helped you generate any ideas of your own! I’d love to hear how it turned out.

Rules

-Must Randomize at least one sim.
-Sims must be autonomous.
-Completely random choices, use https://www.random.org/lists/ and
 https://www.random.org/integers/ with the lists to determine details.
-If it comes down to a 1 or 2 option, or yes or no answer, 1 is yes, 2 is no. Modify the integer list as accordingly.
-Randomize relationships in this fashion, also depends on how many characters you’re using.
-You can choose where they live within a randomized town, but try to restrict yourself to their amount of money if you want to add anything to the house. (I say try because TV’s and computers are expensive, and realistically they would be in a house. Sims could wind up in the house as well and watching tv is a normal action, which is why I mention this.)
-EXTRA CHALLENGE: Number your ideas. Randomize which one you go with.

Here are the base lists I made below, and I added +’s to everything I had as an expansion pack or game pack.

Aspirations

Athletic
Creativity
Deviance
Family
Food
Fortune
Knowledge
Love
Nature
Popularity
+Animal
+Location

Traits

Active
Cheerful
Creative
Genius
Gloomy
Goofball
Hot-headed
Romantic
Self-assured
Unflirty
Art Lover
Bookworm
Foodie
Geek
Music Lover
Perfectionist
Ambitious
Childish
Clumsy
Erratic
Glutton
Kleptomaniac
Lazy
Loves Outdoors
Materialistic
Neat
Slob
Snob
Vegetarian
Bro
Evil
Family-Oriented
Good
Hates Children
Jealous
Loner
Mean
Noncommittal
Outgoing
+Cat Lover
+Dog Lover

Locations

1. Sim’s Home
Oasis Springs
2. Burners & Builders (Gym)
3. Desert Bloom (Park)
4. The Futures Past (Museum)
5. Rattlesnake Juice (Bar)
6. The Solar Flare (Lounge)
Willow Creek
7. The Blue Velvet (Nightclub)
8. Magnolia Blossom (Park)
9. Movers & Shakers (Gym)
10. Municipal Muses (Museum)
11. Willow Creek Archives (Library)
+San Myshuno
12. Mysuno Meadows (Park)
13. Waterside Warble (Karaoke Bar)
14. Casbah Gallery (Arts Center)
15. Planet Honey Pop! (Karaoke Bar)
16. Stargazer Lounge (Lounge)
17. Skye Fitness (Gym)
+Brindleton Bay
18. Brindleton Pawspital (Vet Clinic)
19. Club Calico (Lounge)
20. Deadgrass Discoveries (Museum)
21. Pupperstone Park (Park)
22. Salty Paws Saloon (Bar)
+Magnolia Promenade
23. Paddywhack’s Emporium
24. JF&S Clothiers
25. The Roadstead

Career

+Detective
+Doctor
+Scientist
Astronaut
Athlete
Business
Criminal
Critic
Culinary
Entertainer
Painter
Politician
Secret Agent
Social Media
Tech Guru

Failing Camp NaNoWriMo and Book of the Month

If you’re someone who follows my blog, by now you may have noticed my blog posting schedule has been off kilter. Reflectively, this past month has been one of my most difficult in a while, even compared to both semesters I had 4 classes (20 credit hours) at once. My classes have been almost entirely group projects, which anyone who’s had to participate in them knows the hell that is working with several people at once, especially creative ones who often lack strength in areas besides creativity.

Organizing a film and getting it done is crazy, and for people who work in that industry I cannot begin to understand the patience they have, and that I have none of. Due to all of these school shenanigans and mental health episodes triggered by them, I was unable to finish both main goals I had for the month.

Camp NaNoWriMo, as always, started off great. I was ahead of the minimum for a while, until I decided to change the midpoint. Why did I change the midpoint right when I was getting to the midpoint? I honestly don’t know why it took me that long to realize it didn’t work, but if I hadn’t changed it, I probably would’ve been able to continue at the rate I was going at. I wound up stopping at page 45. I need to finish it, but I think I’ll wait for a little while before I do. I still need to reconstruct the outline.

For July’s Book of the Month, The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller, I am also about halfway through it, at 164 pages of 369 pages. This is the first time where I haven’t been able to finish a book in the month yet still want to read it. So for that, I plan on binge reading as much as I can in the next couple of days to get it done and perhaps make a delayed post about that. It’s a different type of book than I usually read, but I’m enjoying it. That factor just makes it a little slower of a read, but still an enjoyable one.

I can’t speak for August’s Book of the Month yet, but it’s going to be a shorter one. Is that cheating? I wouldn’t say so. I still get to read a book in a month, at least. I’m thinking of one of my new Stephen King books.

The Ignition of My Passion for Storytelling

I can pluck it from one event in my life. Certain memories of mine stand solidly in my mind while in other cases, I can’t remember much from a span of years. In one of those gaps, third grade, one of the hardest years of my academic and personal life, my grades slipped. Not drastically, I still had A’s and B’s, but for one solid year I got consistent, heavy C’s in English.

I can’t remember if English was my favorite subject or not at that point, it was probably art, but I do remember one specific project. We were tasked with recounting a time in our life and retelling it as a short story. We used odd yellow paper that was larger than the usual size and had an uncomfortable texture to it without being flat. The lead hardly showed up on it unless the tip was ready to carve through the page.

I wrote about the most recent Thanksgiving and considering it was the first after my parents divorced, it was just my mom and me. She was making the turkey and getting the table ready when our dogs, allured by the scent of savory meat, were crowding her feet. I can’t remember if our one dog, Buddy, an old Yorkshire Terrier, had passed away at the time, as I remember he passed away in third grade as well. Either way, she fed the dogs as I likely stood uselessly waiting for food. Maybe I was good and set the table, something that was a simple task for me to do just for two.

After dinner when she was cleaning up, she happened to come across a miscellaneous dripping of sauce on the counter. She wiped it up with her finger and popped it in her mouth. What she thought had been turkey juice or gravy was actually juice from the dog food. Her face twisted in bitter disgust and I remember us both laughing at the grievous error. Check that off the “never have I ever” list.

The moment, although brief and enough to gain a small laugh and carry on, meant everything to me in a time where it was hard to smile. Besides the divorce, my best friend had moved away that year as well, and I my little world had shaken so hard it knocked me down for a bit. Although most people at first glance likely wouldn’t suspect that sort of depth from a third grader who still can’t use proper grammar and spell common words correctly. (I still suck with grammar; I wish I could remember the years we actively studied it.)

My teacher didn’t find the story entertaining either, and wrote something to the effect of “this isn’t funny” or “this isn’t interesting.” To her defense, it was likely neither to an adult, especially a teacher reading about thirty of those papers. However, as a child, I took great offense. I believed it to be funny, and if she couldn’t see that— well, I’d just have to write more and get better to prove I could write a good story.

In third grade, I was still playing pretend at recess with the friends I had left, and when that friend group disintegrated around fifth grade, I started writing my ideas of worlds and villains instead of acting them out. Although I moved them onto a backup drive to save space, I wrote a little more than a hundred stories. I hardly finished any of them, but I had so many ideas I wanted to write I just had to get them down somewhere. It wasn’t until sixth grade when I finally wrote a “book” (about 30 pages in size 18 font) that had a narrative arc to it. The rewritten version of this book was the first I ever finished at about 260 pages. I planned four books for the series but only ever had three of the books on a “first draft” basis (all less than 30 pages, if I’m honest).

I’ll never forget what it felt like to finish writing that book. I realized that I actually could. The first hurdle I needed to jump through to become a writer I had vaulted over: I could complete a manuscript. Of course, it took years and shows the clear progression of improvement as it goes on and thus needs many more drafts, but I had done it.

I still have that paper. The decaying pages from almost a decade ago. It sits in a bin at my mom’s house, I think inside of a plastic bag for some form of preservation. (When I return to my Mom’s house I’ll take a picture of it and attach it to this post.) It taught me how to take feedback. While I wasn’t pleased with it, I took it into consideration, and I went to work. It was one of the hardest lessons to learn, but an absolutely necessary one, and I’m glad I learned it early on. I am forever thankful to this teacher in particular, among many others that I couldn’t have grown without the aide of. She was the one that ignited the flame to my passion that’s glowing brighter with time.

Camp NaNoWriMo July 2018

In hindsight, I recall in my prior 2018 NaNoWriMo post for April how I was confused about it being so early. I still don’t know why there are two, but the more, the merrier! The only things that have changed since April’s camp NaNoWriMo are that instead of being in four classes, I’m now in three for this summer semester, and additionally, I won’t be working on the novel that I have been for the past two NaNoWriMo’s.

To get into my Senior Development class for the winter quarter, we have to submit a portfolio of at least two works during midterms of fall quarter. Fall quarter is when I’m set up for the first half of writing a feature film, and most other people in my graduation year have already taken this awhile ago. So, I have to make up for lost time and write a feature film over the summer, so I have something to graduate with.

Therefore, my July 2018 Camp NaNoWriMo goal is to write 110 pages of a feature script for this action-packed suspense/thriller I’m writing, Double Bind. One assassination goes wrong when the targets have fled the country and have instead placed their estranged daughter in their home. To make matters worse, a different assassin is hired to kill them both. They have to work together to survive this ordeal and find out who’s behind all of this.

I’m already at a full 17 pages in three days, so things are going pretty well. I worry about how I’ll do during the second act, but I’m sure I’ll be able to fix any issues that arise. And in regards to my previous NaNoWriMo novel, I wasn’t able to finish it last month, and I’m not entirely sure when I will, but I’ve got some time in the next few months that I’m sure I can hunker down for the last few chapters. If you’re doing Camp NaNoWriMo, I hope your progress is going smoothly, and if it isn’t, it’s only day four, so don’t lose hope on catching up!

Camp NaNoWriMo 2018 – Results

When I posted my last blog, I was a little over a thousand words behind my planned pace. It was also midterms for me. For the next few days I wrote about a thousand words a day and pulled ahead of schedule to complete my goal on the 29th! (Which you could’ve seen ahead of time if you follow me on twitter. 😉)

Camp-2018-Winner-Certificate

In April, I wrote 21,403 words towards my work in progress novel Obscura. I tried to finish it for NaNoWriMo back in November, but that crashed and burned about halfway through. This time, I was able to come back from the mini-crash halfway. It helped to have a smaller goal where I had to write about 666 words a day instead of 1,666 words per day. I found I was most successful when I made it a part of my routine to write an hour or so before going to bed.

camonanowrimo_2018

As happy as I am about meeting my goal, I still have a couple of scenes left to get done. I estimate I’ll have about 10,000 more words before I finish the book. It would set the book at about 60,000 words. While I usually aim for 70-75 thousand words, I already have an idea what I’ll have to edit and also rewrite certain sections. Of course, I’m currently editing my novel What Darkness Does, so I’ll save Obscura for after that.

I hope everyone did well on their goals; even if you didn’t finish, you still have more than you started with!

Camp NaNoWriMo 2018 – Weeks 2-4

There’s a reason this blog is late as well as any updates; I haven’t been able to sit down and write for almost the entire first week! Moving took more energy out of me than I imagined. I was so close to 10,000 words –my halfway point– that I felt that I wouldn’t post an update until I at least reached that goal.

I hit it Wednesday night after four nights of being unable to write. The only other writing I managed to do that week was about a hundred words the day before moving, and about a hundred words the first day of my moving process. I had some time to sit down and focus while waiting for the Comcast guy to arrive and setup my TV and internet.
Immediately following that, when I finally got to getting back on track, I got hit with some sort of upper respiratory infection that has given me a low fever since Friday. I had time to write at that point, but my energy and concentration was focused on being able to breath and stay upright.

I missed last night, since I had to catch up on schoolwork that I didn’t have very much energy to complete over the weekend. Otherwise, I’m at about 14,000 words when I should be at 16,000. I’m not too worried about catching up; the past few days (with the exception of last night) I’ve been writing about 800-1,000 words per night. Now with midterms out of the way, I’m confident that I can catch up and finish on time or maybe even earlier. I look forward to finishing this novel, and finishing this marking period of classes since wow 20 credit hours is doing a toll on me.

I hope everyone else’s Camp NaNoWriMo experiences are going better than mine!

Camp NaNoWriMo 2018 – Week 1

I don’t know how I’m doing it, but I’m managing to keep up to pace with my word goal. In my first week, I wrote 6,061 words, with a goal of 4,662 words if I went to my predetermined pace of 666 words a day. On average, I’ve been writing about 772 words per day. I generally spend around 30-45 minutes each day to focus on writing my novel, which is a lot considering I have a course load of 20 credit hours a week. My time between getting assignments done and packing to move is very sparse, and I expect to be tested in the upcoming week.

In November I was thrown off my groove from some things, but one of the more prominent being finals. Midterms are approaching. However, I only have one formal midterm test to take. I expect that I might slump a little this weekend with my moving situation, but thankfully I’m ahead right now to hopefully deal with that. I have a couple of other things that are popping up — because when else besides when I’m doing a monthly challenge— like applying for more scholarships and for a potential peer tutor job.

When it comes to writing the novel itself, I’ve discovered that I’ve been shifting different scenes back and forth. While they logically are in better order and my plans are rough touchstones, I worry about keeping track of everything that still needs to be paid off. I usually allow flexibility so certain things can arrive naturally while I’m writing, but it still worries me as I move forward. I think that’s my overhanging sense of general anxiety, however, so I will pursue 20,000 words nonetheless!

Camp NaNoWriMo 2018

Remember how in a little blog post back in November I revealed I didn’t actually finish my NaNoWriMo novel? I decided to finish it for Camp NaNoWriMo! I was about 29,000 words in, so my goal is to write about 20,000 more words to reach the original NaNoWriMo goal. Due to a crazy amount of pop up issues and events in November, I hadn’t accounted for them to plan around them. In April, I’ve already planned out all of my assignments and when I’m doing them plus about how much time it’ll take to complete them. I may have an overfilled 20 hours a week course load, but I’m up for the challenge.

What is NaNoWriMo? It’s an acronym for National Novel Writing Month (in November), and also a nonprofit organization. The goal for November is to write at least 50,000 words of a novel. There’s also Camp NaNoWriMo, which is where you can set your own goals; whether it be editing or a different amount of words. It typically takes place sometime near the summer (although it’s a little early this year if you ask me; can’t go “camping” if it’s not summer).

For this, I’ll be continuing a novel I’m working on called Obscura. A major issue I had where I left off of writing was how to get between major plot points. I can’t just go from little events to something catastrophic, so finding the incidents to build up to the climactic scene was what I focused on solving in the past few months. Now that I’ve got almost as many events as I had already written, I feel confident enough to continue.

Despite the fact I have three lecture classes and a studio, so far in the first couple days of writing it hasn’t been too difficult. Although I might be overestimating for the difficulty level from being the second week of classes, I don’t think it should be too difficult to find time to work on this project of my own. Because I want to write about 20,000 words for Camp NaNoWriMo, I would need to write about 666 words per day. This takes me about half an hour on average, and so far I’ve been able to accomplish such. Because it’s been only school nights so far, I’ve been holding off until my homework’s done to write. It’s a block of time I’m sure I can devote for the rest of April, however, I can see being mentally overloaded from classes to be a potential issue. I’ve only written Sunday and Monday’s additions, totaling 1,845 words. I look forward to working on this for the next month and coming out with a solid first draft after having fixed the issues I was struggling with before.

How Digimon Inspired Me to Pursue Writing

Digimon was —and is— my favorite animated TV show. Sometimes it’s hard to tell between Digimon, Sailor Moon, and South Park, but ultimately when I look at my impulse purchases around me, I see that I am surrounded by the Digimon franchise in various forms. (I bought a Koromon plushie last week off of eBay. It still lasts.) Digimon will forever be an influential experience on my work, not just because of the high quality of the show itself, but the experience it provided.

 

koromon_ebay

How can I resist this face?

 

The premise to Digimon, if you’re unfamiliar, is that average kids go to a summer camp and wind up getting sent into the “digital world” within the internet. They were the “DigiDestined”— children from the regular world who could travel to the digital world, and by the help of their digital monster (Digimon) friends, they could restore peace between the digital world and the real world. The latter’s effect we see more throughout the end of the first season, along with Digimon: The Movie.

Within the spirit of the premise, it allows the viewers (albeit children) to put themselves inside the narrative; it gives them a chance to believe in the possibility of joining that reality. (Which is ultimately why Digimon will forever be better than Pokemon, but I digress.) The level of craft that allows the viewers to be able to engage with the suspension of disbelief to achieve full immersion is something that is incredibly inspirational to me. I aim with everything I write to be able to have that level of plausible believability.

We not only see the characters struggle with the problems presented as being digi-destined, but we see them come to age as they grow up. They age throughout the series, and while they do change, they still remain true to their core being. With such a large main cast for a children’s show, Digimon approaches several important topics like divorce, separation, loss, and when your strengths can become your weaknesses. Tai, the main character, is the digi-destined who has the crest of courage. He is, therefore, the most courageous. He takes this too far at one point where he made Augumon digivolve when Autumn wasn’t ready, turning Augumon into SkullGreymon instead of regular Greymon, resulting in Augumon turning into a terrifying and corrupted beast. Through that, they learn the importance of not only boundaries but how to be responsible with one’s courage and not cross the line into being reckless. Those are deep meanings for a children’s show to approach –especially in the early 2000’s–, and the ability to do so without diverging too far from the plot is something that I wind up thinking about whenever I wonder if I’m going off too far on a tangent.

In addition, the villains are a terrifying, and impressive threat to the characters. (Lookin at you, Jesse, James, and Meowth.) Devimon attacks TK—one of the children— but Patamon saves the day by sacrificing himself. While Digimon doesn’t die, Patamon’s data is reverted back to a digi-egg until he has enough power to digivolve up the power chain again. In the second season (which continues with the kids from the first season, who are now older, along with some new kids) it turns out that one of the enemies is another kid who’s been calling himself the “Digimon Emperor” and enslaving Digimon in the digital world. That’s a risky move to make especially with impressionable kids being the audience. However, we see that he eventually comes to his senses (he didn’t think Digimon were real beings) and winds up being one of the DigiDestined.

The show doesn’t sugarcoat the crimes he’s committed against Digimon; multiple Digimon, even after he’s reformed, are wary of him and call him out on how awful he was. In Digimon: the movie we see Diaboromon, whose influence has leaked into the human world by spreading computer viruses around. At one point intercontinental ballistic missiles are launched from the Pentagon getting hacked. Diaboromon (in another form) manages to age regress the kids in the real world, putting a few in danger from how young he makes them.

The show expertly weaves different storylines together while staying true to its themes and its goals. It is character driven and allows the audience to become characters themselves by allowing there to be a suspension of disbelief. The show is still fresh after I’ve seen it hundreds of times, and I fully believe it is one of the best-animated shows out there that are oriented for children. While the audience for my writing is young adults, I wish to be able to tap into the power of nostalgia and the feeling of being involved with the narrative. I could probably write an entire book about how much I love Digimon, but for today, I’ll end my praise here.

 

IMG_0017

The merchandise might’ve helped the immersion too… 😉